Crops, farm, food, gardening, God's word, Healthy, Herbs, no pesticides, non-gmo, nourishment, Organic, Urban Gardening

The Faith Garden Part 1

We are enslaved if we must rely solely upon our jobs, money, supermarkets and agribusiness to eat.  Thank God for His (yes, it’s His) system of seed time and harvest that never ceases.  We can all grow at least some of our own food.  You will start small but you will want to grow more because it was God’s first job for us.  He gave us the power to feed ourselves.

Devotional, eating, food, God's word, Healthy, scripture

8 Day Really Nourish Yourself Devo Day 3: Recognize the Enemy

Hello my Friend! You are three days in to your new food life!

You have arrived 8 Day Really Nourish Yourself Devo Day 3: Recognize the Enemy! On day one, you took a page from Daniel to purpose in your heart to no longer defile yourself with delicacies. Next, you took steps to renew your mind as God instructs us to do in Romans 12.

Today it’s time to start to take a good look at food. Proverbs 23:3 in the NKJV says “Do not desire his delicacies, For they are deceptive food.” A delicacy in terms of edibles, as defined in Websters 1828 Dictionary, is that which delights the senses. Please notice that since we have renewed our minds we are much less liberal with the use of the word food, and this version of Websters appears to also indicate that there are edibles which possibly are not to be called food since they don’t nourish the body.

That’s a good start to defining and identifying these delicacies that we are warned not to desire (or crave). In today’s world, we are even encouraged to crave them! You know what they are, the most recognizable enemies include cakes, candies, cookies, fast food and soft drinks.

These have actually become easy and even trendy to avoid, altogether eliminate. 🍪🍩🍰🚫 If that’s all it took, then you wouldn’t need 8 Day Really Nourish Yourself Devo Day 3: Recognize the Enemy, now would you?

8 Day Really Nourish Yourself Devo Day 3: Recognize the Enemy
Ad on the back of an NYC MTA city bus.

The Not-So-Recognizable Enemy

The truth is that it isn’t in these where the most insidious deception lies. When I think about deceptive foods I think about %100 fruit juice, where the free sugar (that is unencumbered by fiber) is just as abundant and damaging to the body as the sugar in soft drinks. I think about granola bars, which contain whole grains but also contain half a day’s worth of free sugar in the one small snack. Fruit snacks for children. My daughter was noticing in a corner store the other day that a particular brand is now saying that fruit is their first ingredient, but we turned the package around to the back and notice that the fruit is juice concentrate, followed immediately by sugar AND corn syrup. Talk about deception!

8 Day Really Nourish Yourself Devo Day 3: Recognize the Enemy More Deception Brought to Light

🍥 Yogurt, framed in our consciousness as a health food, is a dairy product. Cow’s milk has been linked to numerous cancers and diseases in children and adults.  Although goat milk is a biblical super food, again, it is NOT for daily consumption.

🍨 Items labeled Low Fat still sell so well because we still haven’t awakened to the fact that that fat alone doesn’t make you fat. What you’re really buying is something in which the processors have replaced the fat with sugar and so the boom in Low Fat processed foods on the market has been consistent with dramatic increases in obesity rates and related diseases.

🍞 Refined starch sounds like something that should be good (as in “fine”) but the refining process is designed to strip the wheat of its nutrient-rich germ because it is the germ that shortens its shelf life. Enriched flour and bread is so called because after the germ is taken out of the grain and processing is underway, the producer adds synthetic vitamins to it to try to replace what God already built in and, as you can imagine, the result pales in comparison to the original composition. I could go on and on!

Purpose, Renew, Recognize

“But Daniel purposed in his heart that he3 would not defile himself with the portion of the king’s delicacies, nor with the wine which he drank; therefore he requested of the chief of the eunuchs that he might not defile himself.”

‭‭Daniel‬ ‭1:8‬ ‭NKJV‬

If you notice, Daniel used this same word to identify that which he would refuse to defile his body with: delicacies. In the King James, both Daniel and Proverbs 23 call them dainties. Even in those descriptions they are deceptive. The damage they cause over years of consumption is neither delicate nor dainty. Rather, it is usually devastating.

8 Day Really Nourish Yourself Devo Day 3: Recognize the Enemy
Living Your New Food Life!

So my dear loved one, you’ve purposed in your heart.  You’ve renewed your mind.  Now it’s time to recognize and eschew the stuff that isn’t God’s will for your body. If it isn’t straight from the earth and it comes in a package, read every label!  If you can’t pronounce it, denounce it. Through your purposeful heart and renewed mind’s eye, you will indeed start to recognize the enemy easily.  You will see him all up and down the middle aisles of the supermarket and in many other places. This is your victory.

You are now done with 8 Day Really Nourish Yourself Devo Day 3: Recognize the Enemy! Nice Job!

Meditate on your scripture for the day:

Proverbs 23:3

Watch A Prophecy of Delicacies 

To return to the 8 Day Really Nourish Yourself Devotional page, CLICK HERE.

Click Here to go to Day 4.

Children, eating, farmer's market, food, Fruit, God's word, Healthy, Herbs, natural, no pesticides, non-gmo, nourishment, Organic, Produce

Summer Gardening in the City

For the last two summers,

we have been using any available space we have in our 12th floor apartment in Staten Island, NY to grow our own food.  Now is the time, April in the northern hemisphere, to get your garden ready for the season!

Train up a child in the way he should go,
And when he is old he will not depart from it.

Proverbs 22:6 (NKJV)

Some of my fondest childhood memories growing up in Brooklyn were of our summer gardens.  I remember how my mom and dad used to go to the garden shop on Foster Avenue in April to get the little baby plants and lovingly plant them in our backyard, our mini Eden.  Even on those tiny plots of land (the small plot behind our home on Hubbard

Summer memories!

Place, and the even smaller spot of backyard when we moved to our one family house on East 43rd) mom and dad grew enough food for us to have lots of fresh salads and homegrown veggies all summer long and into the fall some years, depending on how the cold weather started.

One summer, we grew so many tomatoes, my mom piled the surplus up in one of those big DuaneReade shopping bags and took them to work to share with her friends.  I have never departed from his spirit of growing my own food, putting my hands in dirt, and sharing some of what we produce at home.  It was important training indeed.  As soon as I had children flourishing under my care, my maternal spirit lead me to create the terrace garden.

This year, I’m excited to be moving to the Trinidadian countryside, where my father-in-law blessed my family with some land that we can build, live and cultivate on, but my heart is still with my fellow urban gardeners. As cities sprawled wider and wider over the last century or so, urbanites became more and more detached from the source of the very food that sustains them, so much so that many wouldn’t recognize the vine that a cucumber grows on.  Just think about that.  If you don’t know food or where it comes from, how can you take proper care of your body?

Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.

Hippocrates of Kos

Also, if you have no idea how food grows and where it comes from, doesn’t that put you at a big disadvantage to whomever provides the food?  That is indeed the case.  What is even more cause for great concern is that we are learning that we can’t trust those who provide the food, specifically the corporations that are on the warpath to gain control of all the farms and all the minds and hearts of consumes nor the governments, whom we entrust with the task of ensuring that our food is safe to eat but instead put profit over people by allowing lobbying and campaign finance determine how they legislate the industry.

Here are some ways you can take back control of your food at home.  Combine these ideas with participation with the creation or the maintenance of gardens in your community and you can greatly increase your own control over your food and reduce your dependence on Big Food and, by default, Big Pharma.

Summers in Brooklyn: My childhood urban backyard garden Circa 1990-sumpin.
  • Just get started
    1. Plant SOMETHING.  ANYTHING!  Watch it grow.  It will expand your consciousness.  Next year, you will want to plant more!
  • Any dirt patch is fair game
    1. Postage stamp-sized yard in the back and/or front of your house? Small sliver of dirt along the side? As long as there is soil, you can bring forth life and food!  Plant smaller plants like thyme and basil or bulbs like spring onion and garlic in these small spots.
  • Pots of many sizes and shapes, plus fences, railings and other resources
    1. Pots: It’s good to get a sense for how big the plant is going to be as you select pots.  Conversely, if you already have some pots, buy plants that would work well in the pot sizes you have and think about adding pots if you want to expand your repertoire.  I used my taller, deeper pots for bell pepper plants and tomato vines and my more shallow, rectangle shaped pots for herbs and leafy greens that didn’t need as much space for root growth.

      Urban Herbs
      Two varieties of Thyme and Greek Oregano in the NYC Summer Terrace Garden.
    2. Fences and Railings: For vine plants, plan those around the edges of your garden if possible so they can climb on existing structures.  Not only will it look great, but your plants will be happy as they reach for the sun and bear you good fruit all season long!
    3. Other Resources: Observe your plants as they grow.  One day last summer, my children and I went to the park to collect sticks.  We brought the sticks home and used them to stablize our tall, lanky tomato and pepper plants as they grew.  We stuck them into the soil next to the “trunks” of the plants, and loosely tied the plants to the sticks so when the wind blew them on our well exposed 12th floor terrace, they would remain standing.  They thanked us later with delicious produce.
    4. Soil: The term dirt cheap has real meaning, because bags of soil in the home good store are pretty cheap indeed!  The good news is that although organic soil is more expensive than stuff that is not labeled organic, it is still cheap so might as well go all the way with it!
  • Kitchen counter herbs
    1. You can keep some herbs on your kitchen counter.  Your kitchen light (yes the ceiling one) can substitute for the
      Genesis 1:29-30 Status! #SoDelicious #TheReallyNourishMovement

      sunlight if you don’t have a window in there – your potted thyme and oregano can still photosynthesize from that.  Just keep them watered and don’t be shy about pruning them often for use in your food.

  • Regenerate bulbs
    1. Ever notice that the bottoms of some of your veggies have little scraggly beards?  Like scallions (some call these spring onions or green onions ) for example. Some have had them chopped off, like celery, fennel and garlic. These are bulbs.  You can cut the tops off to eat, but don’t toss the bottoms!  Set them in some water and allow them to regenerate.  Then you can plant them out and keep repeating the process as many times as you like.  Here’s a link with a detailed list of these wonderfully nourishing gifts from God.  Now that’s what I call the gift that keeps on giving!
  • Seedling plants at farmers markets
    1. OK, this is my FAVORITE DETAIL: Check your local farmer’s markets right now img_3082because many of them will be selling seedlings.  But here’s the exciting part: You can buy them with your EBT card!  No excuse now, family!  The other great thing about buying these at the farmer’s market is that you can ask the farmers advice about how to plant.  Last summer, I even brought pics of my grown plants back for my local market guys to see.  Like “Look, the kids have grown so fast!”
  • Dwarf trees
    1. This is a great solution for city dwellers, one that you can eat from all year round.  Dwarf citrus trees can live in relatively large pots in your living room and bear delicious fruit that would cost you a small fortune in supermarkets with no chemicals necessary.  Choose a spot near a window that gets lots of sunlight – eastern facing works well, so the tree can get strong rising sun exposure all morning.
  • Savor and Share the experience! 
    1. The best part is harvest!  I enjoyed going onto my terrace to pick from my plants to enhance my meals with what I grew.  My children
      Ché is a happy garden princess!

      enjoyed picking with me.  We all learned together how to grow our own food, and when we had visitors, we were proud to show them what we were doing and give them a taste of the the bounty whenever we could.



Plants on sale at Whitehall Terminal Farmer’s Market


Children, chocolate, health, Healthy

The Uncandy Sale

I’ve been teaching my daughter about the dangers of sugar. Since we have been working to eliminate sugar from our diets and our homes, new things come up all the time! Or old things, like our annual World’s Finest Chocolate Bar Candy Sale… We can’t sell chocolate but we will help our PTA raise money anyway!!

We are going to raise at least enough to match one box of chocolate.

Giving, God's word, Healthy, Namaste, nourishment, Uncategorized, vegan

#Eat #Give #Love #Live

Today’s lunch from Sun in Bloom made me so grateful that I can access good, clean, nourishing food. Those of us who are so privileged have an obligation to those who are not so blessed. Next time you go shopping, buy a few extra things, pack a little separate bag, and ask God to show you who needs it.

And when they say “thank you”, reply “thank you for accepting it”.  You both participated in serving a higher purpose and neither of you could have completed the mission without the other.



cooking, food, Glycemic, Healthy, recipe, vegan

ReallyNourish Bites: Krispy Kurly Kale Chips – You can eat just one.

We like the curly kale to make chips because the curls crips nicely in the oven.
We like the curly kale to make chips because the curls crips nicely in the oven.

When my children ask mommy for “chips”,

mommy’s home made Krispy Kurly Kale Chips are definitely included in that category for them.  The other alternative is our favorite Garden of Eatin’ Sprouted Blue Corn chips, so don’t worry friends, none of the real junk is passing their lips!

People’s main complaint about this  leafy green nutrient powerhouse is that it is too coarse.  Here’s a way that anyone can enjoy it even on their first try! We like the curly kale, green or purple, or a mix of the two will do nicely.  Rinse and thoroughly dry with paper towels or in a salad spinner if necessary.

Here’s how we do it:

Krispy Kurly Kale Chips make a nourishing, delicious side dish.
Krispy Kurly Kale Chips make a nourishing, delicious side dish.
  • Preheat the oven to 400°F (205°C
  • Strip the hard stems out of the Kale and break them up into pieces on a sheet tray or a sizzle platter
  • Drizzle liberally with Extra Virgin Olive Oil and Sea Salt to taste
  • Pop in the oven for 10-15 minutes.  The curly edges get nice and crisp (check by touch at 5 minute intervals to avoid overcooking), while the rest of the vegetable keeps its color and flavor very nicely.
  • Cool and serve.  They make a nice side for a wrap or sandwich. Kids love them!!
Mix Purple and Green Kales for a beautiful, nourishing snack!
Mix Purple and Green Kales for a beautiful, nourishing snack!

BUT because of their extremely *Low Glycemic Index, unlike their potato-based counterparts, they don’t cause weight gain and have you constantly craving more and more.  Very satisfying indeed!!

*Glycemic Index, defined by the University of Sydney, the leading authority on this topic:

The glycemic index (GI) is a ranking of carbohydrates on a scale from 0 to 100 according to the extent to which they raise blood sugar levels after eating. Foods with a high GI are those which are rapidly digested and absorbed and result in marked fluctuations in blood sugar levels. Low-GI foods, by virtue of their slow digestion and absorption, produce gradual rises in blood sugar and insulin levels, and have proven benefits for health. Low GI diets have been shown to improve both glucose and lipid levels in people with diabetes (type 1 and type 2). They have benefits for weight control because they help control appetite and delay hunger. Low GI diets also reduce insulin levels and insulin resistance.